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VIDEO: Using Yoga to Calm the Revved-Up Client

The Yoga Breath’s Universal Application

Amy Weintraub • 3/7/2016

Brain science has revealed how deep breathing can calm our overactive nervous system, clear our distressed mind, and restore us to a balanced emotional state, says Amy Weintraub, a recognized leader in the practice of yoga and a presenter at this year’s Psychotherapy Networker Symposium
So how do you introduce these techniques in session to an anxious client who may be averse to the idea of yoga? Hear Amy explain. . .

Daily Blog

The Power of Yoga in the Therapy Room

Amy Weintraub's No-Mat Yoga Techniques for Helping Clients Relax and Reflect

Amy Weintraub • 1/7/2016

The work of therapy can’t begin in earnest if the client’s mind is racing or fogged by depression at the beginning of the session, or if tension is so great that bodily awareness is lost. Offering a simple yoga practice as a portal into the session can enable your client to experience a shift in attentiveness and mood. A variety of no-mat yoga practices and rituals can help quiet mental chatter, reduce bodily tension, and promote a heightened awareness of oneself and one’s surroundings. All these techniques are perfectly suited to the consultation room.

Daily Blog

In Consultation

Yoga in the Therapy Room: Centering the uncentered client

Amy Weintraub • 7/8/2013

Recently, therapists have begun to use simple, no-mat yoga practices to help clients whose minds are racing or fogged.

Magazine Article

In Consultation

Take a Breath: Using Yoga to Create a Sense of Well-Being in Your Office

Amy Weintraub • 3/1/2010

A variety of easy-to-use yogic breathing techniques can add a new dimension to treatment with depressed and anxious clients.

Magazine Article
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VIDEO: Using Yoga to Calm the Revved-Up Client

The Yoga Breath’s Universal Application

Amy Weintraub • 3/7/2016

Brain science has revealed how deep breathing can calm our overactive nervous system, clear our distressed mind, and restore us to a balanced emotional state, says Amy Weintraub, a recognized leader in the practice of yoga and a presenter at this year’s Psychotherapy Networker Symposium
So how do you introduce these techniques in session to an anxious client who may be averse to the idea of yoga? Hear Amy explain. . .

Daily Blog

The Power of Yoga in the Therapy Room

Amy Weintraub's No-Mat Yoga Techniques for Helping Clients Relax and Reflect

Amy Weintraub • 1/7/2016

The work of therapy can’t begin in earnest if the client’s mind is racing or fogged by depression at the beginning of the session, or if tension is so great that bodily awareness is lost. Offering a simple yoga practice as a portal into the session can enable your client to experience a shift in attentiveness and mood. A variety of no-mat yoga practices and rituals can help quiet mental chatter, reduce bodily tension, and promote a heightened awareness of oneself and one’s surroundings. All these techniques are perfectly suited to the consultation room.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 1 (2 Items)

In Consultation

Yoga in the Therapy Room: Centering the uncentered client

Amy Weintraub • 7/8/2013

Recently, therapists have begun to use simple, no-mat yoga practices to help clients whose minds are racing or fogged.

Magazine Article

In Consultation

Take a Breath: Using Yoga to Create a Sense of Well-Being in Your Office

Amy Weintraub • 3/1/2010

A variety of easy-to-use yogic breathing techniques can add a new dimension to treatment with depressed and anxious clients.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (2 Items)
Amy Weintraub, MFA, ERYT-500, is the author of Yoga for Depression and the founder and director of the LifeForce Yoga Healing Institute, in Tucson, Arizona, where she maintains a Yoga therapy practice. Amy is a senior Kripalu teacher and Mentor, and serves as the LifeForce Facilitator for the Psychotherapy Networker Symposia. She leads professional trainings and workshops in LifeForce Yoga internationally, including Kripalu Center, Omega, Mt Madonna, the Crossings, national medical conferences, the University of Georgia Medical School. She was also a 2007 Colloquium Speaker at the Boston University Graduate School of Psychology.

Amy writes frequently on the subject of yoga and mental health for national magazines and psychotherapy journals and is often interviewed in newspapers, on national radio programs and in magazines. She is featured on the first home video practice to address mood, LifeForce Yoga to Beat the Blues-Level I (DVD), and the CD Breathe to Beat the Blues. Amy maintains an archive of research and news on Yoga and mental health on her web site: www.yogafordepression.com.

Amy has participated in advanced Yoga trainings in the United States and India, including Kripalu Center in Lenox, with the Desikachar Family in the U.S., the Lakulish Institute in Gujarat, India, the Vivekanandra Kendra in Bangalore, India, and Vedanta studies at the Narayana Gurukula in Tamil Nadu.