Sort by:

How Neuroscience Can Change the Way You Practice

Knowing about the Brain Can Actually Change It

Bonnie Badenoch • 5/25/2017

By Bonnie Badenoch - Initially, it can seem like a huge leap to link abstruse and complicated brain science to the relational world of therapy. But, some day, it may seem absurd that we didn't study the processes we're expected to treat. Once my clients understand where their brain wiring is underdeveloped, they become eager to do whatever it takes to build better neural connections.

Daily Blog

Brain to Brain

Applying the Wisdom of Neuroscience in Your Practice

Bonnie Badenoch • 10/8/2008


Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (2 Items)
Page 1 of 1 (0 Items)

How Neuroscience Can Change the Way You Practice

Knowing about the Brain Can Actually Change It

Bonnie Badenoch • 5/25/2017

By Bonnie Badenoch - Initially, it can seem like a huge leap to link abstruse and complicated brain science to the relational world of therapy. But, some day, it may seem absurd that we didn't study the processes we're expected to treat. Once my clients understand where their brain wiring is underdeveloped, they become eager to do whatever it takes to build better neural connections.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 1

Brain to Brain

Applying the Wisdom of Neuroscience in Your Practice

Bonnie Badenoch • 10/8/2008


Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1
Bonnie Badenoch, Ph.D., LMFT is an in-the-trenches therapist, supervisor, consultant, teacher, and author who has spent the last nine years integrating the discoveries of neuroscience into the art of therapy. Out of this study - combined with her 19 years of working with survivors of trauma and attachment struggles - came her book, Being a Brain-Wise Therapist: A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology, published in 2008 as part of Norton's Interpersonal Neurobiology Series, and The Brain-Savvy Therapist's Workbook (2011). Therapists are saying that her books fill the gap between science and practice, and do it with compassion and heart.

She teaches in Portland State University's Interpersonal Neurobiology Certificate program. Additionally, Bonnie consults with fellow clinicians and educators; works with agencies to implement IPNB principles; speaks around the country; and assists other IPNB enthusiasts in their writing endeavors. In 2006, she was one of six co-founders of GAINS (Global Association of Interpersonal Neurobiology Studies), a nonprofit educational organization that promotes application of the principles of IPNB as articulated by Daniel J. Siegel, Allan Schore, Louis Cozolino, and others. She has served the organization on its working board and has recently been elected to the advisory board as well. As part of her mission to share this transforming wisdom with clinicians and educators, she was editor-in-chief of Connections & Reflections, GAINS quarterly publication, and will continue as co-editor-in-chief of its new yearly publication in 2012. She has a gift for translating the complexities of brain science into words, experiences, and examples that allow people to internalize the principles, so they can use them in the counseling room.