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The Beethoven Factor

Three Qualities of People Who Triumph Under Adversity

Paul Pearsall • 9/20/2017

By Paul Pearsall - Quantum leaps of thriving sometimes happen. However, most thrivers rarely recognize their invincibility in a short period of magnificent epiphany. Like Ludwig van Beethoven, they have periods of dismal lows and unrealistic highs. Through it all, thrivers maintain the key characteristic of thriving.

Daily Blog
Copyright:
2/21/2013
Authors:
RICHARD SIMON, PH.D.
 
KATY BUTLER, MA
 
MARY SYKES WYLIE, PHD
 
PAUL PEARSALL, PHD
 
RICHARD HANDLER, PHD
Product:
NRC095565

The Beethoven Factor

The People Who Thrive in the Face of Extreme Adversity May Surprise You

Paul Pearsall • 1/2/2004

Thrivers are not Pollyannas. They are not blindly optimistic and are far from showing the often irritating feigned cheerfulness that can result from trying to comply with popular psychology's version of positive thinking. Their invincibility derives not just from their discovery of what they are able to do about their problems, but also from their acceptance of what they may never be able to do.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1 (3 Items)
Copyright:
2/21/2013
Authors:
RICHARD SIMON, PH.D.
 
KATY BUTLER, MA
 
MARY SYKES WYLIE, PHD
 
PAUL PEARSALL, PHD
 
RICHARD HANDLER, PHD
Product:
NRC095565
Page 1 of 1

The Beethoven Factor

Three Qualities of People Who Triumph Under Adversity

Paul Pearsall • 9/20/2017

By Paul Pearsall - Quantum leaps of thriving sometimes happen. However, most thrivers rarely recognize their invincibility in a short period of magnificent epiphany. Like Ludwig van Beethoven, they have periods of dismal lows and unrealistic highs. Through it all, thrivers maintain the key characteristic of thriving.

Daily Blog
Page 1 of 1

The Beethoven Factor

The People Who Thrive in the Face of Extreme Adversity May Surprise You

Paul Pearsall • 1/2/2004

Thrivers are not Pollyannas. They are not blindly optimistic and are far from showing the often irritating feigned cheerfulness that can result from trying to comply with popular psychology's version of positive thinking. Their invincibility derives not just from their discovery of what they are able to do about their problems, but also from their acceptance of what they may never be able to do.

Magazine Article
Page 1 of 1
Paul Pearsall, Ph.D., received numerous awards for his research on the relationship between the brain, heart, and immune system. He was the author 18 best-selling books including Awe: The Delights and Dangers of Our Eleventh Emotion.