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Myths and Realities of the Asperger's Experience

Normalizing and Mobilizing Clients and Their Families

Richard Howlin

By Richard Howlin - Adults with Asperger's syndrome often behave as if they were confused actors walking onto a stage and being the only ones who don't know the lines or the plot. One of my initial goals in therapy is to help them realize the role their brain plays in their everyday practical and social understanding. Then, we embark on a step-by-step process of skill training, life planning, and helping clients integrate their unusual and obsessive talents into a productive life.

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The Frequently Overlooked Reason Some Kids Misbehave

A New Treatment Offers Hope for the Undiagnosable

Karen Smith

By Karen Smith - The delicate interaction between the brain and body known as sensory integration allows us to live without being driven to distraction by the cacophony of sensory experience that bombards us every day. But for some children, sensory integrative dysfunction impairs the ability to judge accurately whether the sensation is important or trivial, and therefore, how to respond logically and efficiently.

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Pinpointing Suicidality with Brain Science

Can the Brains of the Dead Give Hope to the Living?

Charles Barber

By Charles Barber - For the last three decades, Victoria Arango has been studying the brains of people who committed suicide, and has discovered that the biochemistry of their brains differs significantly from that of people who don't commit suicide.

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VIDEO: Rick Hanson on Overcoming the Brain’s Negativity Bias

Creating Lasting Change

Rick Hanson

Rick Hanson, a neuropsychologist and author of Buddha's Brain, will be a keynote speaker at this year's Networker Symposium. Here, he talks about our brain's negativity bias and how to help our clients overcome it. After all, our job as therapists is to help our clients make lasting changes by changing the brain.

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