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Millennials and the Tyranny of Choice

Three Ways to Help Young Clients Work Through the Real Problem of Choosing Unwisely

Martha Straus • 11/17/2018 • No Comments

By Martha Straus - After a difficult case, I decided to consult with a small group of millennials, who helped me grasp what a big deal choosing has become for this generation. Here are three adjustments I've made to help millennial clients struggling with the tyranny of choice take hold of their lives and approach differently the sense of paralysis they feel.

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VIDEO: Dan Siegel on Embracing the Energy and Creativity of the Adolescent Mind

Why Adolescent Behavior is More Than Just Raging Hormones

Dan Siegel • 10/31/2018 • 1 Comment

In his Symposium address, Dan Siegel challenged some common myths about adolescence and suggested that the aspects of adolescence that can drive us crazy—novelty seeking, social engagement, emotional intensity, and creative exploration—are exactly what we need to cultivate to maintain vitality in our own adult lives.

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Helping Children Master Anxiety with a Superhero's Gusto

Putting Kids in the Therapeutic Driver's Seat

Lynn Lyons • 10/26/2018 • 2 Comments

By Lynn Lyons - Why are our children so anxious and getting more so? It seems puzzling. After all, we live in the age of “helicopter parents” and ubiquitous child professionals. But too often in our anxiety to stop the anxiety, we surround the child with an anxiety-reinforcing system fixated on protecting the child from any twinge of the dreaded disease.

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A Nightmare No More

Repairing the Parent-Child Bond is a Two-Way Street

Dafna Lender • 10/8/2018 • No Comments

By Dafna Lender - When difficulties arise between parent and child, most therapists naturally focus treatment on the child. But the parent–child bond is a two-way street, and parents come with their own history. In these situations, I can often find ways to help parents and children connect through attachment-based games that involve elements of silliness, movement, and surprise.

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VIDEO: Dan Siegel on Engaging Teen Clients

They're More Interested in Brain Science Than You Think

Dan Siegel • 10/3/2018 • No Comments

Dan Siegel knows that nobody—especially an angst-filled teenager—likes being told what to do. That’s why he takes a more roundabout approach to connecting with younger clients. By taking the emphasis off of "talking about feelings" and placing it on science, he creates a space that can lead to action-oriented solutions and positive growth. See how it's done.

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Therapy's Transformational Moments

Finding Hope in Seemingly Hopeless Times

Barry L. Duncan • 9/25/2018 • 2 Comments

By Barry Duncan - A recent consult I did illustrates the intrinsic rewards of healing involvement and intimate connection. It also taught me that anything is possible—that even the bleakest sessions can have a positive outcome if you stay with the process.

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Therapy with a Storyteller's Mindset

Learning to "Enter the Scene" with Clients

David Seaburn • 9/20/2018 • 1 Comment

By David Seaburn - Both doing psychotherapy and the writing of fiction are about stories. The essence of the art of both pursuits is the openness to the possibility that, no matter how small, no matter how fleeting, things might not only be different, but, perhaps, better.

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Inside the Mind of a Child with Asperger's

Here's an Exercise to Help Children with Asperger's Fit In

Diane Yapko • 9/11/2018 • 4 Comments

By Diane Yapko - Teachers and parents who understand how Asperger's syndrome affects children can use small behavioral interventions throughout the day to help them learn new skills and adapt their own rigid desires and expectations in order to be more flexible and likeable to peers.

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When Doing Nothing is Everything

Especially with Kids, Learning to Slow Down Is a Precious Gift

Alicia Muñoz • 8/30/2018 • 1 Comment

Alicia Muñoz - When I got sick, something amazing happened: I let go of my agenda. Poof—just like that. In the process, I learned there’s nothing more important than doing nothing for extended periods of time, particularly with your child. It’s easy to overlook nondoing as an important activity—or as an important inactivity.

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The Healthy Parenting Brain

What Neuroscience Reveals about Good Parent-Child Bonding

Dan Hughes • 8/24/2018 • 3 Comments

By Jonathan Baylin and Daniel Hughes - Parenting isn’t a cookbook activity for managing children’s behavior: it’s an ancient mammalian mind–heart process, which allows a caregiver to stay engaged and regulated enough to sustain the mind-to-mind, heart-to-heart connections that are vital for a child’s development.

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