Archives

Sort by:

Learning to Manage the OCD Bully

A Story of One Woman’s Journey for Help

Diane Cole • No Comments

By Diane Cole - An OCD sufferer describes the frustrating stops and starts and misdirections of her circuitous search for help in escaping the maze of her family of origin and the deep-seated tropes in her own brain.

Read more...

The Quest to Influence, Persuade, and Alter

What the Brain Reveals About Our Power to Change Others

Diane Cole • No Comments

Review By Diane Cole - Emotions can change people's behavior, says cognitive neuroscientist Tali Sharot in her new book, a highly accessible exploration of why and how we succeed, or fail, in our quest to influence, persuade, or alter the opinions and actions of others. Understand how the brain works, she argues, and you’ll have a leg up in successfully formulating and delivering the messages you want to get across to others.

Read more...

Viktor Frankl's Classic Has Just Been Released for Young Adults!

A YA Edition Brings Man's Search for Meaning to a New Generation

Diane Cole • No Comments

By Diane Cole - Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl is best known for is his extraordinary first-person narrative about his experiences in a Nazi concentration camp, as told in Man’s Search for Meaning. Now, his classic work will be published for the first time in a young adult and classroom-ready edition.

Read more...

Why Torture Doesn't Work

What Neuroscience is Showing Us

Diane Cole • No Comments

By Diane Cole - Using a broad swath of scientific, psychological, and medical evidence about brain function, Shane O'Mara, a professor of experimental brain research, delves into—and disproves—popular misconceptions about the brain under stress, memory, and the psychological state of torturers.

Read more...

Challenging the Stereotype of the Paralyzed Trauma Victim

A Review of Jim Rendon's Upside: The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth

Diane Cole • No Comments

In Jim Rendon’s new book, Upside: The New Science of Post-Traumatic Growth, he challenges an all-too-common stereotype: that most trauma survivors remain forever stuck in place, embittered, broken in core ways. As psychotherapists know, the emotional (and sometimes physical) damage may sometimes be so vast and entrenched that repair comes slowly, if at all. But as therapists also know, this isn’t always the case. Many trauma victims have managed to make life go on---and even thrive.

Read more...

Page 1 of 1 (5 Blog Posts)