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Has Happiness Been Taken Too Far?

Three Reasons Happiness is Sometimes Harmful

Todd Kashdan and Robert Biswas-Diener • 8/9/2018 • No Comments

By Todd Kashdan and Robert Biswas-Diener - A common theory holds that happiness is humanity’s natural resting state. But positive emotions and thoughts aren’t always useful. Here are several often overlooked research results about a happy mindset that sound a warning.

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VIDEO: Why Not All Mental Health Problems Are Psychological

Minding the Body Means More Than Just Taking a Pill

Robert Hedaya • 8/8/2018 • 2 Comments

Most therapists recognize that physiological processes hugely influence emotion and behavior. But according to psychiatrist Robert Hedaya, too many tend to practice as if treatment should focus entirely on the mind. A comprehensive physiological evaluation is needed, he says, before determining that a medication trial is appropriate.

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3 Concerning Messages about the Netflix series “Insatiable”

…And 3 Ways to Talk about Them with Your Clients

Judith Matz • 8/8/2018 • No Comments

By Judith Matz - There’s been a lot of outcry from mental health professionals, doctors, parents, and people who’ve suffered from eating disorders about the trailer for the new Netflix series, Insatiable, which portrays higher-weight people in a poor light. Here are three alarming myths the series perpetuates, and the lessons we can learn from them.

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Are You Missing Your Client's Signals?

Lesser-Known Ways of Strengthening the Therapeutic Alliance

Steve Andreas • 7/26/2018 • No Comments

By Steve Andreas - Getting immediate, nonverbal feedback from clients is essential to knowing how they’re responding in a session, and in maintaining the therapeutic relationship, which research shows is essential for successful therapy. Here are some strategies to increase your sensitivity to nonverbal shifts.

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VIDEO: Stephen Porges on the Building Blocks of Healthy Relationships

What Co-Regulation Actually Looks Like

Stephen Porges • 7/18/2018 • 8 Comments

In developing the Polyvagal Theory, psychophysiologist Stephen Porges transformed the way therapists understand the underlying mechanisms of traumatic response and how safety, caring, and trustworthiness are conveyed unconsciously in our body language, voice tonality, facial expression, and eye contact. In this video clip, he explains what healthy co-regulation looks like in the body.

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Are We Getting Mindfulness Wrong?

Buddhist Thought Pioneer Mark Epstein Has a Message for Therapists

Ryan Howes • 7/7/2018 • No Comments

By Ryan Howes - For psychiatrist and bestselling author Mark Epstein, a state of mindfulness isn’t just a prescription for quieting an anxious mind: it’s an introductory phase to a much deeper process of healing and enlightenment. In the following interview, he breaks down the intersection of Eastern and Western thought playing out in our culture today.

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Why Would Anybody Become a Therapist?

Reflecting on the Soul of Our Professional Identity

Barry L. Duncan • 7/6/2018 • 3 Comments

By Barry Duncan - It’s no secret that this is a tough time to be a therapist. In public agencies, we’re underpaid, overworked, and held to unattainable "productivity standards." So why would anybody choose to enter such a field? Recent findings reveal that therapists stay in the profession not because of material rewards, but because they value connecting deeply with clients and helping them to improve.

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The Labels We Use

When It Comes to Addiction, Sometimes a Diagnosis is a Client's Best Motivator

Margaret Wehrenberg • 7/5/2018 • 2 Comments

By Margaret Wehrenberg - The labels we use to describe clients’ behaviors have important therapeutic implications. Sometimes using the word addiction and explaining its neurological basis can help clients focus on the consequences of their behavior. But how do we parse the tenuous line between addiction and habit?

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Therapist Peer Groups, the "Emotional Lifeboat"

Doing Self-Care by Yourself Isn't Always Enough

Patrick Dougherty • 6/22/2018 • No Comments

By Patrick Dougherty - In the sea of trauma that surrounds us in our daily lives and in our offices, self-care is a life jacket. But collective trauma needs a collective response. Being part of a group of therapists dedicated to talking about vicarious trauma and sharing their own experiences is more than a life jacket—it's a human lifeboat, one with more resilience than we could ever generate alone. 

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The Heart of Emotional Intelligence

Illuminating the Connection Between What We Feel, What We Want, and How We Act

Steven Krugman • 6/18/2018 • 3 Comments

By Steven Krugman - Mentalization refers to the mind’s innate capacity to make sense of social experiences and implicitly know how to respond to them. But while mentalization fosters an empathic awareness of the moods and mindsets of others, it also enables us to know what our own states of mind and body mean.

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