Archives

Sort by:

When Helping Doesn't Help

What to Do When Your Client Doesn't Want to Change

David Burns

By David Burns - What if a client's resistance to change reveals something positive, beautiful, and even healthy about them—something that we’ve overlooked? If we can learn to put unconscious resistance front and center in our clinical work, we can lessen or even eliminate our clients’ resistance altogether.

Read more...

How Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Rose to Power

...And the Transformative Session That Inspired Its Creator

Mary Sykes Wylie

By Mary Sykes Wylie - Cognitive behavioral therapy is arguably the most successful therapy ever developed. But where did this streamlined, efficient, practical therapy come from that would prove such a good match for our fast-paced, high-tech civilization?

Read more...

Judith Beck on the CBT Approach to Depression

...And Her Response to Therapists Who Think It's Too Structured and Restrictive

Judith Beck

By Judith Beck - In the following interview with CBT pioneer Judith Beck, she explains the basics of the cognitive therapy approach to depression, including its step-by-step process, why homework is so important, and how good CBT therapists confront the possibility of relapse from the very first session.

Read more...

England's Grand Mental Health Care Experiment

Did "the World's Most Ambitious Effort" to Expand Treatment Fall Flat?

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - England's Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative provides mental health care to more than 900,000 people annually, and employs more than 6,000 therapists. But can psychotherapy really be systematized on a nationwide scale?

Read more...

The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach to Overcoming Depression

Judith Beck Explains Her Method of Depression Treatment

Judith Beck

The hallmark of cognitive therapy is understanding clients’ reactions—emotional and behavioral—in terms of how they interpret situations. The repeated themes in people’s thinking and behavior finally make sense once we understand the basic way they view themselves, their world, and other people. But cognitive therapy goes beyond helping people understand their thoughts and behaviors in sessions. People actually get better by making small changes in their thinking and behavior every day. As therapy progresses, homework assignments and relapse prevention become essential parts of the approach.

Read more...

Page 1 of 1 (5 Blog Posts)