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The Four Types of Depression and How to Overcome Them

Using the "Microtherapy" Approach

Margaret Wehrenberg • 6 Comments

By Margaret Wehrenberg - Rather than seeing depression as some kind of monolith, I've found it useful to see depressive symptoms as falling into four basic clusters. By immediately addressing the attitudes and distinctive vulnerabilities that lie at the core of each cluster, treatment can begin to bring about a shift in brain function that makes longer term work easier.

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When Your Client Drops a Last-Minute Bombshell

Four Common Scenarios and How to Handle Them

Daniela Gitlin • 2 Comments

By Daniela Gitlin - When clients drop “bombshells” in the last few minutes of a session, it can be hard to end on time. Here's a framework for not only handling these unexpected moments, but welcoming them.

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VIDEO: What to Do When Your Client Cries

Making Tears Your Therapeutic Ally

Jay Efran • 1 Comment

Many times, when clients cry, clinicians feel an urge to rush in and “fix things” that aren’t broken, which can actually make things worse. Watch as Jay Efran explains his strategy for working with a crying client.

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The Healing Power of Crying

...And Why Calming Your Client Can Actually Backfire

Jeffrey Von Glahn • 5 Comments

By Jeffrey Von Glahn - Many clinicians are unaware of the difference between clients' therapeutic crying and situations in which clients are forced to deal with an overwhelming incident. Just a minute or two of deep therapeutic crying can bring about profound changes. And facilitating therapeutic crying isn’t complicated. Most of the time, the less the therapist does, the better.

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VIDEO: Margie Nichols Shares Her Most Memorable Therapeutic Moment

In the Valley of the Shadow

Margie Nichols • 1 Comment

Many people wonder how therapists manage to do the work they do. Of the thousands of meaningful sessions that take place in a therapist’s office, certain ones stand out. In the following video from the 2016 Symposium, renowned therapist Margie Nichols shares a transformational story from her own life in therapy.

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What Attunement Really Looks Like

Step One: Confronting Your Own Limitations

Molly Layton • 1 Comment

By Molly Layton - The longer I practice, the more I'm struck with the importance of tolerant, hovering attentiveness that looks, Janus-faced, both outwardly at the client and inwardly toward the therapist's own processes.

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How to Locate Your "Felt Sense"

Eugene Gendlin's Six Steps to Focusing

Marian Sandmaier • 1 Comment

By Marian Sandmaier - On a hot August morning in 2012, I sat with 25 strangers in a former Capuchin monastery overlooking New York’s Hudson River. We were there to spend a week learning about a therapeutic process known as Focusing. I couldn’t have known then that this deceptively simple practice would alter my life.

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The Tantrum

A Personal Essay from our Family Matters Department

Jo Ann Miller • 1 Comment

By Jo Ann Miller - A wise grandmother, recalling the trembling fury of her own childhood, weathers a grandson's tantrum.

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Six Things Therapists Are Saying After the Election

. . . And Why You Shouldn't Be Afraid to Call Out the Chicken Littles

Chris Lyford • 2 Comments

By Chris Lyford - Regardless of where you stand politically, it’s hard to deny that the 2016 presidential election was one of the most stress-inducing in recent history. Democrats and Republicans alike continue to wrestle with lingering anxiety and tension. But none of this comes as a surprise to most therapists, who’ve been on the front lines of treating post-election stress. Here are some valuable lessons they’ve taken away from their recent work helping clients in these post-election times. 

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What to Do When Your Therapy Clients Cry

Understanding the Emotional Neutrality of Tears

Jay Efran • 1 Comment

By Jay Efran - How can both joyful and tragic events elicit tears? This question puzzles many clinicians, including some who are considered experts in the field of emotional expression. The problem is that few of us have received explicit training in theories of emotion. And sometimes, clinicians can feel an urge to rush in and “fix things” that aren’t broken.

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