Archives

Sort by:

When Depression Runs in the Family

Being Haunted Isn't the Same as Being Cursed

Martha Manning

By Martha Manning - My family is haunted by depression. My mother can trace it back in her family at least six generations. When it hits, it hits hard. My own battle with depression has focused on developing an understanding of the commonalities I share with my mother and grandmother, appreciating aspects of our shared legacies as some of the things I most valued in myself. Being haunted is not the same as being cursed.

Read more...

VIDEO: Addressing Climate Fears in Therapy

Moving Clients from Paralysis into Action

Lauren Dockett

In the following interview, ecotherapist Patricia Hasbach explains how practitioners can address the rise in eco-anxiety and depression.

Read more...

Embracing Grief in a Laundromat

Honoring a Sister's Memory

Martha Manning

By Martha Manning - It was 4:00 a.m. and I was the only patron in one of the most broken-down laundromats in the Commonwealth of Virginia. My sister Sarah, after decades of turmoil and tumult, had died the day before—a combination of pain and painkillers.

Read more...

What Can We Do to Stem the Suicide Spike?

An Interview with Psychiatry Professor and Author Kay Redfield Jamison

Ryan Howes

By Ryan Howes - Helping suicidal clients is one of the most important interventions we can make as therapists, and it’s one of the scariest aspects of our work. Kay Redfield Jamison, psychiatry professor and bestselling author, shares her thoughts on how the fields of medicine and psychology can work to better understand and treat severe mood disorders and suicidality.

Read more...

The "Marbling" Approach to Treating Depression

Three Simple Methods for Joining Depressed Clients While Still Inviting Possibility

Bill O'Hanlon

By Bill O'Hanlon - Repeating patterns can "groove" the brain; that is, your brain gets better and faster at doing whatever you do over and over again. This includes "doing" depression, feeling depressed feelings, and talking about depression. To counter this effect, I like to use a method I call "marbling," going back and forth between investigations of depressed and non-depressed experiences and times.

Read more...

Judith Beck on the CBT Approach to Depression

...And Her Response to Therapists Who Think It's Too Structured and Restrictive

Judith Beck

By Judith Beck - In the following interview with CBT pioneer Judith Beck, she explains the basics of the cognitive therapy approach to depression, including its step-by-step process, why homework is so important, and how good CBT therapists confront the possibility of relapse from the very first session.

Read more...

Beyond Beige

Surviving a Battle with Severe Depression

Martha Manning

By Martha Manning - Depression hits you where you live, annihilating even the basic functions, and graduating to the most complex. At its worst, depression extinguishes the pilot light, depriving you of the substrate that makes you feel real.

Read more...

VIDEO: Jon Kabat-Zinn on the Radical Gesture of Mindfulness

What It Means to Really Practice Meditation

Jon Kabat-Zinn

When he introduced Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction to the West, Jon Kabat-Zinn transformed the way we regard the Self, and the psychological ailments that befall it. In this video clip from his 2015 Networker Symposium Keynote, he explains the transformative power of mindfulness in clinical work and your own life.

Read more...

We Need to Talk About Depression Recurrence

Talking About Staying Well After Therapy May Be Lifesaving

Marian Sandmaier

By Marian Sandmaier - Virtually all clinicians make clear to departing clients that they’re welcome to return to therapy at any point. But for clients with recurrent depression, that may not be enough. I propose that before termination, therapists talk with clients candidly about the possibility of another episode of suffering down the line.

Read more...

Searching for a Language for Depression

The Vocabulary of Diagnosis Isn't Telling Our Stories

Joshua Wolf Shenk

By Joshua Wolf Shenk - Each year, seventeen million Americans and one hundred million people worldwide experience clinical depression. What does this mean, exactly? Too many of us take comfort in language that raises the fewest questions, provokes the least fear of the unknown. When we funnel a sea of human experience into the linguistic equivalent of a laboratory beaker, we choke the long streams of breath needed to tell of a life in whole.

Read more...

Page 1 of 2 (14 Blog Posts)