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How to Prepare for Insurance Company Treatment Reviews

Tips for Proving Your Therapy is Medically Necessary

Barbara Griswold

While treatment review has always been a part of insurance reimbursement, therapists in the last few years have reported an increase in such phone calls from insurance companies. But what’s the health plan looking for when reviewing for medical necessity? What does the language of medical necessity sound like, and how can you learn to speak it fluently? Here are a few tips.

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Uncovering the Source of Suicidality with Brain Science

Are Serotonin Levels the Key Factor in Suicidal Depression?

Charles Barber

I'm at the New York State Psychiatric Institute in northern Manhattan. My guide, Victoria, has been studying the brains of people who committed suicide, and has discovered that the biochemistry of their brains differs significantly from that of people who don't commit suicide. But there are aspects of their work that trouble me. Could our brains be so sick that they'll kill us? How much do our brain chemicals control our lives, and what control is left to us?

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Can Mood Science Save Us from the Depression Epidemic?

Psychotherapy Tackles Depression as a Low Mood Problem

Jonathan Rottenberg

How can it be that—despite all the efforts aimed at understanding, treating, and educating the public about depression—the number of people suffering from depression continues to rise? Why have our treatments plateaued in their effectiveness, and why does the stigma associated with this condition remain very much with us? Depression has clearly been a tough nut to crack, but we haven’t focused much on what’s at the center of that nut: mood.

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Examining DSM-5's Most Controversial Change

Today’s Video: Gary Greenberg on the Bereavement Exclusion

Rich Simon

“When DSM-III came out and the major depression diagnosis was created,” Gary tells us in this brief video clip, “it was immediately clear that many people who were recently bereaved were going to qualify for that diagnosis. So the question became, what should therapists do about that? And the answer, ultimately, was to create an exclusion—to say that if you’re within two months of bereavement, you don’t meet the criteria for major depressive disorder. You can’t be diagnosed. But this doesn’t make any sense at all.”

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Attempting Connection with the Resistant Client

Can You Help a Client Want to Change?

David Johnson

In my several decades of practice, one skill that’s served me well in this field is my ability to leave work at the office. But every once in a while, I see clients whose situation intrigues, moves, or confounds me in a way that keeps them in my thoughts in between sessions.

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Examining the Most Controversial Change in DSM-5

Gary Greenberg On The Bereavement Exclusion

Rich Simon

When examining the various changes made in DSM-5, Gary Greenberg finds the most controversial one to be the removal of the bereavement exclusion from the major depression diagnosis.

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