Archives

Sort by:

How Much Do You Really Understand Self-Compassion?

The 5 Myths Keeping You Trapped in Self-Criticism

Kristin Neff

By Kristin Neff - An impressive and growing body of research demonstrates that relating to ourselves in a kind, friendly manner is essential for emotional wellbeing. More pointedly, research proves false many of the common myths about self-compassion that keep us trapped in the prison of relentless self-criticism.

Read more...

A Shared Mission

Therapist-Police Partnerships are Changing How Communities Tackle Mental Illness

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - For almost a year, therapist Courtney Tran has been embedded in the Aurora Police Department as part of a two-year Department of Justice initiative designed to improve the way law enforcement tackles mental health issues. But getting a program like this off the ground can be an uphill battle.

Read more...

Changing Our Contract with Life

A Therapist's Story of Battling Chronic Pain

Kevin Anderson

By Kevin Anderson - This is the story of one of the most turbulent storms in my personal and professional life. After the storm, I learned there’s something about healing from deep emotional suffering that feels like death and rebirth—the kind that asks us to be open to changing our contract with life.

Read more...

The Best Way to Support Older Caregivers

...And the One Question You Probably Didn't Think to Ask

Nancy Kriseman

By Nancy Kriseman - The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.2 million Americans affected by dementia are over the age 65, which makes the vast majority members of what’s called the traditionalist generation. Understanding this generation’s entrenched values and how they can affect their coping and your intervention can facilitate better outcomes.

Read more...

Uncovering the Source of Suicidality with Brain Science

Are Serotonin Levels the Key Factor in Suicidal Depression?

Charles Barber

I'm at the New York State Psychiatric Institute in northern Manhattan. My guide, Victoria, has been studying the brains of people who committed suicide, and has discovered that the biochemistry of their brains differs significantly from that of people who don't commit suicide. But there are aspects of their work that trouble me. Could our brains be so sick that they'll kill us? How much do our brain chemicals control our lives, and what control is left to us?

Read more...

Assessing the State of Psychotherapy

Is Today's Therapy Losing Out to Science and Psychopharmacology?

Mary Sykes Wylie

The bad news was made official in 2010, though everybody in the head-shrink business had long suspected as much: psychotherapy was in decline, or even in freefall. You might think this trend represents people’s preferences for the quick fix of a pill, rather than a slog through talk therapy, but you’d be wrong: surveys have consistently shown that depressed and/or anxious people and their families would rather talk to a real, live, human therapist than fill a prescription. So in what appears to be the twilight of the psychopharm gods, why aren’t therapy practitioners rising up, throwing off their chains, and reconquering lost mental health territory?

Read more...

Revolution on the Horizon

DBT Challenges the Borderline Diagnosis

Katy Butler, Katy Butler

DBT was no walk in the park: it required team treatment, including weekly individual therapy, a year-long "skills training" class, telephone coaching and supportive supervision for the therapist. But it offered clients and therapists alike a way out of chaos--a systematic clinical package that integrated the technical and analytical strengths of behaviorism, the subtleties of Zen training, the warmth and acceptance of relationship-centered therapies and the often undervalued power of psychoeducation.

Read more...

The Accidental Therapist

Jay Haley Didn't Set Out to Transform Psychotherapy

Mary Sykes Wylie

Jay Haley, who died earlier this year at the age of 83, was an unlikely candidate to become a founder of the early family therapy movement. An outsider to the field, he had no formal training in psychology or psychotherapy. Yet, if you ask family and brief therapists who most inspired them, chances are his name will be among the first mentioned, and if you ask which figure inspired the best arguments about therapy, you'll probably get the same result.

Read more...

What If We Could Prevent Mental Illness?

Today’s Video: David Mays on the Future of Biological Psychiatry

Rich Simon

Phenylketonuria is a disease that results in mental retardation. It’s an inability of the infant’s body to get rid of an amino acid called phenylalanine. If you’re born with a certain gene, you can’t get rid of it and end up with mental retardation. But according to psychiatrist David Mays, author of the Major Mental Illness Pocket Guide, the way we treat phenylketonuria may be the way of the future in treating a range of psychological disorders.

Read more...

The Increasing Role of Biology in the DSMs of Tomorrow

How Genetics Shape Psychopathology

Rich Simon

Rather than continuing to lament the deficiencies of DSM-5, forensic psychiatrist David Mays wants to focus on what's ahead for the psychotherapy field. In his view, some of the most important advances in years to come will be finding objective, biological markers for many psychological disorders.

Read more...

Page 1 of 2 (12 Blog Posts)