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A Shared Mission

Therapist-Police Partnerships are Changing How Communities Tackle Mental Illness

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - For almost a year, therapist Courtney Tran has been embedded in the Aurora Police Department as part of a two-year Department of Justice initiative designed to improve the way law enforcement tackles mental health issues. But getting a program like this off the ground can be an uphill battle.

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Making Partners Therapists for Each Other

In a Good Relationship, Your Problems Aren't Yours Alone

Ellen Wachtel

By Ellen Wachtel - In couples therapy, if we can help each partner be a better therapist for the other, all three of us can feel more helpful and effective. My favorite way is to start by using a particular exercise to provide a window into each partner’s psyche.

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Partnership within Therapy

How a Coaching Approach Can Promote Faster Change

Lynn Grodzki

By Lynn Grodzki - In my early training as a psychodynamic therapist and a social worker, I was taught that my primary role was to follow, not lead. But I've since learned that working “close in” with clients can grease the wheels of motivation, helping them take action faster, and with more behavioral compliance.

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After an Affair, How Much Should Be Shared?

How to Have an Honest Discussion Without Accusations and Defensiveness

Shirley Glass

By Shirley Glass - How much to share and when to share are issues that confront every couple trying to recover from the discovery of infidelity. I actively structure the timing and the process of disclosure because I've found that revealing the details of an affair is seldom constructive in the presence of uncontrolled emotional intensity or unresolved ambivalence about the future of the marriage.

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How Focusing Partnerships Can Re-energize Your Therapy Practice

Joan Klagsbrun and Lynn Preston Offer a Self-Care Method for the Therapist

Lynn Preston and Joan Klagsbrun

A growing body of research indicates that when we don’t feel effective in our work, burnout is likely to follow. But through a process called Focusing partnerships, a two-therapist encounter emphasizes the clinician's issues, especially those that are still fuzzy or half-formed, not yet able to be verbalized. It lets us dive beneath our cognitive brain into our embodied knowing and to find what's actually troubling us, and to use that knowledge to recover our zest for our work and our lives.

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