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The Four Types of Depression and How to Overcome Them

Using the "Microtherapy" Approach

Margaret Wehrenberg • 6 Comments

By Margaret Wehrenberg - Rather than seeing depression as some kind of monolith, I've found it useful to see depressive symptoms as falling into four basic clusters. By immediately addressing the attitudes and distinctive vulnerabilities that lie at the core of each cluster, treatment can begin to bring about a shift in brain function that makes longer term work easier.

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What Climate Change Could Mean for Therapists

Moving from Anxiety to Action

Lauren Dockett • 1 Comment

By Lauren Dockett - In 2017, the American Psychological Association published a guide to the psychological impact of today’s grim environmental realities on clients and communities, and says therapists should expect to deal with increased levels of eco-anxiety, depression, fatalism, suicide, PTSD, and aggression as natural disasters increase. Their advice? Let clients acknowledge their sorrow and fears, and then help them find empowerment through action.

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Embracing Grief in a Laundromat

Honoring a Sister's Memory

Martha Manning • No Comments

By Martha Manning - It was 4:00 a.m. and I was the only patron in one of the most broken-down laundromats in the Commonwealth of Virginia. My sister Sarah, after decades of turmoil and tumult, had died the day before—a combination of pain and painkillers.

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VIDEO: What to Do When Your Client Cries

Making Tears Your Therapeutic Ally

Jay Efran • 1 Comment

Many times, when clients cry, clinicians feel an urge to rush in and “fix things” that aren’t broken, which can actually make things worse. Watch as Jay Efran explains his strategy for working with a crying client.

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What Can Therapists Learn from The Minimalists?

Expert Joshua Millburn Explains What It Really Means to Let Go

Ryan Howes • No Comments

By Ryan Howes - How does minimalism correlate with wellness? Why do we crave stuff, yet feel relief when we let it go? We therapists can easily identify the pathology of hoarding, but can we also see the benefits of embracing minimalism? To find answers to those kinds of questions, we caught up with Joshua Millburn, co-founder of The Minimalists.

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High Lonesome

Braving the Quest for True Belonging

Brene Brown • No Comments

By Brené Brown - High lonesome is a type of music in the bluegrass tradition that captures the mood of isolation many people feel today, as we turn away from one another and toward blame and rage. Our challenge as a nation is to reclaim human connection and true belonging even as, more and more, we sort ourselves into antagonistic tribes. But to do that, we’ll need to choose courage over comfort.

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A Daughter's Broken Heart

A Special Story from Our Family Matters Section

Gregory Samuels • 1 Comment

By Gregory Samuels - My daughter has a broken heart. She’s 6,000 miles away, across an ocean, on a semester abroad, and she’s stricken. I was about the same age as Erin is now when I first had my heart broken, and I can’t help but wonder if, along with bad love-karma, I’ve somehow passed along some terrible predisposition. Was there a way to raise her so that she’d be impervious to love turned sour?

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The Tantrum

A Personal Essay from our Family Matters Department

Jo Ann Miller • 1 Comment

By Jo Ann Miller - A wise grandmother, recalling the trembling fury of her own childhood, weathers a grandson's tantrum.

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What to Do When Your Therapy Clients Cry

Understanding the Emotional Neutrality of Tears

Jay Efran • 1 Comment

By Jay Efran - How can both joyful and tragic events elicit tears? This question puzzles many clinicians, including some who are considered experts in the field of emotional expression. The problem is that few of us have received explicit training in theories of emotion. And sometimes, clinicians can feel an urge to rush in and “fix things” that aren’t broken.

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Our New, Complicated Relationship with Death and Dying

Helping Our Therapy Clients Cope with the Specter of Death

Joseph Nowinski • No Comments

In spite of what’s clearly a massive social shift in the way we now enter and exit the domain of death, we still really don’t know how to talk about it. We haven’t yet begun to have the difficult, honest conversations---person to person, family member to family member, doctor to patient, therapist to client---that would help us better understand what to expect of this harsh landscape, and how to pick our way through it. As therapists, we’re uniquely well-placed to engage people in this emerging conversation and bring this topic into the light of shared experience.

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