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Escaping the Criticism Trap

Here's an Exercise That Makes Criticism Disappear

Steve Andreas • 1 Comment

By Steve Andreas - I don’t know anyone who hasn’t been sent reeling from the slightest criticism, no matter how much positive feedback they get about their work. But some people experience this reaction daily or hourly. Many don’t even wait for someone else to criticize them: they provide it themselves, making it truly inescapable. Here's how to help them gain some perspective.

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How Much Do You Really Understand Self-Compassion?

The 5 Myths Keeping You Trapped in Self-Criticism

Kristin Neff • 3 Comments

By Kristin Neff - An impressive and growing body of research demonstrates that relating to ourselves in a kind, friendly manner is essential for emotional wellbeing. More pointedly, research proves false many of the common myths about self-compassion that keep us trapped in the prison of relentless self-criticism.

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Helping Clients Access Their True Selves

Dick Schwartz on Changing Outer Dialogues by Changing Inner Dialogues

Richard Schwartz • No Comments

By Richard Schwartz - As clients embody more Self, their inner dialogues change spontaneously. They stop berating themselves and, instead, get to know, rather than try to eliminate, the extreme inner voices or emotions that have plagued them. Even clients who've shown little insight into their problems are suddenly able to trace the trajectory of their own feelings and emotional histories with startling clarity and understanding.

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The Paradox of Acceptance

Richard Schwartz Shares What Wise Buddhists Have Known for Centuries

Richard Schwartz • 4 Comments

By Richard Schwartz - We normally think of the attachment process as happening between caretakers and young children, but the more you explore how the inner world functions, the more you find that it parallels external relationships, and that we have an inner capacity to extend mindful caretaking to aspects of ourselves that are frozen in time and excluded from our normal consciousness.

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Could Energy Psychology Transform Couples Therapy?

An Unconventional Approach to One of Therapy's Most Common Dilemmas

David Feinstein • No Comments

By David Feinstein - You might've heard about energy psychology and the use of tapping with PTSD, phobias, and depression. But couples therapy provides a rich context for acupoint tapping, both in the office and as a tool to use at home. The empathy and understanding that emerges in the partner who’s watching can be a game changer, building a path to healing through some of the couple’s most emotionally hazardous territory.

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Introducing Mindfulness in Therapy

Helping Clients Bring Mindful Awareness to Anxious Thoughts and Sensations

Shai Lavie • No Comments

By Shai Lavie - It sometimes seems as if there isn’t a psychotherapy seminar or workshop anywhere in the country that doesn’t have “mindfulness” in the title, yet most therapists these days are still vague about how they can use mindfulness techniques, minute-by-minute, in sessions, and how guiding clients through mindfulness exercises can help resolve difficult, long-standing issues. What follows is a brief primer on the specifics of incorporating mindfulness into therapeutic practice.

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The Negative Habits That Create Unhappiness

A Guide to the Self-Saboteur and Why They Behave the Way They Do

Cloe Madanes • 2 Comments

By Cloe Madanes - Most of us claim we want to be happy—to have meaningful lives, enjoy ourselves, experience fulfillment, and share love and friendship with other people. Strangely enough, however, some people act as if they just want to be miserable, and they succeed remarkably at inviting misery into their lives, even though they get little apparent benefit from it. So if you aspire to make yourself miserable, what are the best, most proven techniques for doing it?

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Using Internal Family Systems to Reduce Self-Criticism

Dick Schwartz Offers an IFS Approach to Self-Compassion

Richard Schwartz • No Comments

When you think of yourself as being psychosocially monolithic, instead of comprising a range of different parts, having self-compassion seems simple: you just relate to the self you happen to identify with at the moment with warmth, rather than harshness. But once you recognize that you’ve got many selves in there, things become more complicated, and it becomes crucial to recognize that there are levels of self-compassion, some of which need much more effort, awareness, and emotional resilience than others.

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