Archives

Sort by

Accessing Emotional Discomfort with Sensorimotor Psychotherapy

What Neuroscience and Attachment Teach Us About Healing Stress in the Body

Janina Fisher • 10/15/2015 • No Comments

The more we learn about the brain, the more apparent it becomes that, if we're to guide people in the process of change, we need to pay at least as much attention to the body and nervous system---theirs and ours---as to words, emotions, and meaning-making---which, until recently, have been the major focus of therapy. Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, a body-centered talk-therapy approach, allows us to navigate tumultuous transferential relationships and therapeutic impasses in creative, satisfying, and often moving ways.

Read more...

Introducing Mindfulness in Therapy

Helping Clients Bring Mindful Awareness to Anxious Thoughts and Sensations

Shai Lavie • 4/28/2016 • No Comments

By Shai Lavie - It sometimes seems as if there isn’t a psychotherapy seminar or workshop anywhere in the country that doesn’t have “mindfulness” in the title, yet most therapists these days are still vague about how they can use mindfulness techniques, minute-by-minute, in sessions, and how guiding clients through mindfulness exercises can help resolve difficult, long-standing issues. What follows is a brief primer on the specifics of incorporating mindfulness into therapeutic practice.

Read more...

The Power of the Emotional Brain

Using Brain Science to Spark Behavioral Change

Brent Atkinson • 6/2/2016 • No Comments

By Brent Atkinson - Throughout history, we’ve been operating under a great deception—we tend to believe that our thoughts and actions result largely from our conscious intentions. In fact, while our rational mind has a degree of veto power, the inclinations that fuel our perceptions, interpretations, and actions primarily come from neural processes that operate beneath the level of awareness. The emotional brain plays a crucial role in the machinery of rationality: the brain generates quick, gut-level emotional reactions that collectively serve as a guidance system for reasoning.

Read more...

Using Empathy to Help Kids Self-regulate

How Being Calm and Collected Gets Us Connected

Rich Simon • 8/4/2014 • 1 Comment

According to Martha Straus, author of No-Talk Therapy for Children and Adolescents, time-outs don’t really nip misbehavior in the bud. Instead, they often exacerbate anxiety, making kids feel misunderstood and alone. Young kids can’t self-soothe and regulate emotion like adults can, Martha says. That’s why, in these sorts of situations, she says we need to turn to co-regulation, “loaning” our limbic brains and emotional stability to help kids feel attended to and comforted.

Read more...

VIDEO: Stephen Porges on How Trauma Affects Our Ability to Connect

The Science Behind Healthy Relationships

Stephen Porges • 12/28/2016 • 1 Comment

Stress responses aren't only vested within the sympathetic nervous system’s capacity to support fight-or-flight behaviors. There’s another defense system that’s mediated through a vagal circuit, says Stephen Porges, creator of the Polyvagal Theory. In the following video from his 2016 Networker Symposium keynote address, he explains how the vagus nerve is affected by trauma, and what this means for our ability to build meaningful relationships.

Read more...

VIDEO: Using Empathy to Help Kids Self-Regulate

How Being Calm and Collected Gets Us Connected

Martha Straus • 9/11/2015 • 1 Comment

In this brief video clip, child psychologist and Symposium 2016 presenter Martha Straus discusses the benefit of using co-regulation with a young client in trouble. 
Don't miss her Symposium workshop, on Friday, March 18, Addressing Attachment Issues with Traumatized Teens.

Read more...

Page 1 of 1 (6 Blog Posts)
livechat