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The Mentor Who Changed My Therapy Practice

…And How Two Little Words Changed Everything

Chris Lyford

By Chris Lyford - While therapeutic skill is the product of years of practice and self-determination, most clinicians need a mentor: someone who takes them under their wing and inspires them to be a better therapist. The five clinicians whose stories you’re about to read all agree on one thing: seeing how their mentors practice left an indelible mark on their personal and professional development that still resonates today.

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VIDEO: Rick Hanson on the Healing Power of Refuge

Focusing on the People, Places, and Activities that Give Us Sanctuary

Rick Hanson

At last year's Networker Symposium, Rick Hanson, psychologist and bestselling author, invoked the spirit of Mr. Rogers to help attendees better acknowledge their connection with each other and savor their most inspiring experiences. Take a moment to watch this clip with Rick Hanson. You'll be glad you did.

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Everyday Heroism

Philip Zimbardo Reflects on His Work on Human Connections and Positive Change

Ryan Howes

By Ryan Howes - Social psychologist Philip Zimbardo may be most well-known for his notorious Stanford Prison Experiment. More recently, however, he's pivoted his work to focus on human connections and positive change. He founded a clinic that helps clients push past self-imposed limits around shyness and established a program that frames heroism as a continual, everyday choice.

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Take It or Leave It

The Therapy of Carl Whitaker

Rich Simon

By Rich Simon - Carl Whitaker was family therapy’s master of the absurd. This Networker profile described him in action demonstrating his belief that the unsocialized inner world of fantasy and impulse is a source of creativity to be defended against society’s abnormal normality.

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Burnout Reconsidered

What Supershrinks Can Teach Us

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble, and Francoise Mathieu

An entire industry has sprung up to address the problem of compassion fatigue, but research indicates that the most commonly proposed answer, improved self-care, doesn’t work. In fact, the study of the most highly effective clinicians suggests that burnout isn’t related to caring too much, but continuing to care ineffectively.

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The Best Practices of Highly Effective Therapists

How Leaders in Psychotherapy Ensure Success

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble, and Barry Duncan

That therapists differ in their ability to affect change is hardly a revelation. But we also recognize that some practitioners are a cut above the rest. With rare exceptions, whenever they take aim, they hit the bull's-eye. Nevertheless, since researcher David F. Ricks coined the term supershrinks in 1974 to describe a class of exceptional therapists—practitioners who stood head and shoulders above the rest, little has been done to further the investigation of supershrinks, and pseudoshrinks—those whose clients experience poor results.

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Supershrinks

What's the secret of their success?

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble, and Barry Duncan

Trying to identify specific interventions that could be reliably dispensed for specific problems has a strong commonsense appeal. No one would argue with the success of the idea of problem-specific interventions in the field of medicine. But the evidence is incontrovertible. Who provides the therapy is a much more important determinant of success than what treatment approach is provided.

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Becoming a Supershrink: Three Steps to Professional Excellence

Getting Client Feedback Isn’t Always Easy, But It's a Necessary Step

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble, and Barry Duncan

Most therapists, when asked, report checking in routinely for client feedback and knowing when to do so. But research has found this to be far from true.

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Improving Therapeutic Effectiveness: Moving Beyond Reliable Performance

How Can We Make Progress in Our Therapeutic Effectiveness?

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble, and Barry Duncan

K. Anders Ericsson’s work on deliberate practice and client feedback explains studies showing that most of us grow continually in confidence over the course of our careers despite little or no improvement in our actual rate of success.

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Deliberate Practice: The First Step on the Path to Professional Excellence

One Team Finds that Deliberate Practice is the First Step to Becoming a Superior Therapist

Scott Miller, Mark Hubble, and Barry Duncan

How do the supershrinks do what they do? Are they made or born? Is it a matter of temperament or training? Have they discovered a secret unknown to other practicing clinicians, or are their superior results simply a fluke, more measurement error than reality?

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