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Five Strategies for When Therapy is Stuck

Bypassing the Limits of Feelings, Judgments, and Language

Steve Andreas • 1/19/2017 • 1 Comment

By Steve Andreas - When therapy goes wrong, it’s typically because we’ve entered our clients’ trance, joining them in their myopic misery. Therapy typically hangs on your ability to demonstrate more skill and awareness in using the trancelike qualities of human communication to move beyond the tunnel vision that can stall therapy and prevent change and healing from taking place.

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Has Happiness Been Taken Too Far?

Three Reasons Happiness is Sometimes Harmful

Todd Kashdan and Robert Biswas-Diener • 1/19/2017 • No Comments

By Todd Kashdan and Robert Biswas-Diener - The research on the overall benefits of happiness is growing steadily. One common theory holds that happiness is humanity’s natural resting state. But positive emotions and thoughts aren’t always useful. Here are several often overlooked research results about a happy mindset that sound a warning.

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VIDEO: Richard Schwartz on How Symptoms Reveal the Path to Growth

Using Internal Family Systems to Befriend the Inner “Protector”

Richard Schwartz • 1/18/2017 • No Comments

Oftentimes, our attitudes toward our anxiety symptoms are misguided, says Richard Schwartz, the originator of Internal Family Systems Therapy. We try to suppress our heavy breathing. We get annoyed by our cold sweats. But by understanding these responses as a positive expression of a wish to protect oneself, rather than simply negative symptoms, Schwartz says, trauma survivors are in a better position to begin the process of healing.

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How Mindfulness Can Boost Your Self-Esteem

Cultivating Self-Compassion with Your Inner Critic

Tim Desmond • 1/17/2017 • No Comments

By Tim Desmond - Buddhist practices hold potential for helping clients, particularly those suffering from low self-esteem. One of the main goals of Buddhist meditation is cultivating compassion and love. Here are several techniques that focus on developing these qualities toward oneself.

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The Two Essential Ingredients for a Loving, Long-Lasting Relationship

John Gottman Shares the Latest Research from his Love Lab

John Gottman • 1/16/2017 • No Comments

By John Gottman - What the latest research from my lab is telling us is that trust and commitment are both the key ingredients for being in love with your partner for a lifetime, and for having your marriage be a safe haven. These are the ingredients for not just loving your partner, but being in love with your partner.

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Changing How You Think About Weight

Four Steps to Transform Your Internalized Views About Body Size

Judith Matz • 1/13/2017 • 2 Comments

By Judith Matz - I’ve come to believe that the way we as therapists feel about our clients’ body size is not only a clinical concern, but a social justice issue. It’s not easy to challenge internal attitudes that are reinforced every day in the general culture, but if you’re willing to go against the cultural current, here are some things you can do to help you assess—and transform—your internalized views about weight and dieting.

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What's Really Behind a Good (or Bad) Decision?

A Simple Practice for Retraining the Emotional Brain

Brent Atkinson • 1/12/2017 • 1 Comment

By Brent Atkinson - Conscious understanding and effort aren’t the mighty forces we assume they are. Our automatic urges and inclinations are much stronger than most of us ever imagined. Even so, there's something we can do to retrain the emotional brain.

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VIDEO: When is It Trauma? Bessel van der Kolk Explains

Is Your Client Traumatized? For the Answer, Look to the Body

Bessel van der Kolk • 1/11/2017 • 3 Comments

Often we hear things from clients like “My relationship ending was so traumatic for me,” or “When my uncle passed away, I was totally traumatized.” With the word trauma being used so loosely and for such a wide range of problems, how do we know what it actually means anymore?

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When Therapy Calls for a Boundary Crossing

A Story About When Professional Helping Meets Human Concern

Dea Silbertrust • 1/10/2017 • 2 Comments

By Dea Silbertrust - I'd been in psychotherapy for more than three years when I was diagnosed with a benign tumor. After surgery, my therapist's willingness to trade the comfort and security of her office for my apartment would be considered a boundary crossing by some. But in accommodating me, she demonstrated the difference between a boundary crossing and a boundary violation, and, more important, what it means to offer a simple act of grace to another human being.

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Psychotherapy's Role in the Wider World

Bill Doherty Makes the Case for a Connected/Committed Self

William Doherty • 1/9/2017 • No Comments

By William Doherty - At this time of fragmentation and division, therapists need to recognize that we’re in the glue business. We know something about helping people connect, about how to form a healthy “we” out of self and other. But first our society needs us to recover our conviction and passionate intensity as a profession, our belief that we have something to offer beyond symptom reduction.

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