Search Magazine Archives

Sort by:

Turns in the Road

Highlights from the Networker Journey

January/February 2017
Out of all the hundreds and hundreds of articles that have appeared in the Networker over the past four decades, we’ve chosen a small sampling that captures the magazine’s most journalistic side, conveying not so much the eternal verities of our profession, but the sense of reading a first draft of the field’s history. Among other things, you’ll find therapeutic methods that, as exciting as they seemed at the moment, didn’t stand the test of time as well as initial forays into discussing complex issues we’re still struggling with today. We’ve also added in a few examples of writing so immediate and compelling that they have an air of timelessness. Prepare yourself for an interesting journey.
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!

Still Crazy After All These Years?

A Look at 30 Years of the Networker

March/April 2012
Remember mimeograph machines, the Milan Group, the False Memory Foundation, DSM–III, the Family Therapy Networker, and private practice before managed care? Take a stroll down memory land and revisit some of the ups and downs of our glorious profession over the past three decades.
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!

Editor's Note

March/April 2007
"If we look squarely at the fundamentals, it becomes apparent that therapy is neither science nor art—it's conversation. Conversation is at once the most subtle and complex of all human activities, and our most important problem-solving tool."

Defining Psychotherapy

The Last 25 Years Have Taught Us That It's Neither Art nor Science

March/April 2007
At last count, therapists could choose from among 500 different treatment techniques. But after all these years, there's still no evidence that the overall effectiveness of therapy has improved. Could the problem be that we still don't understand the fundamental nature of psychotherapy?

Good-Bye Paradox, Hello Invariant Prescription

Palazzoli and the Family Game

September/October 1987
After Italian psychiatrist Mara Selvini Palazzoli became celebrated for her work with therapeutic paradox in the 1970s, she stunned the family therapy world with an even more flamboyant intervention—the invariant prescription.
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!
Page 1 of 1 (5 Magazine Articles)