Search Magazine Archives

Sort by:

The Politics of Mental Health

Highlights from Symposium 2019

May/June 2019
Pioneering trauma specialist Bessel van der Kolk took aim not only at the politics within the therapy field that determine what diagnoses get into the DSM, but the politics in the larger arena that lead people to ignore the prevalence of trauma in society.
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!

Point of View

Theater as Therapy: Can Shakespeare Heal the Trauma of War?

January/February 2019
Stephen Wolfert’s De-Cruit program is giving vets a chance to heal the trauma of war in creative ways.
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!

Therapy’s Psychedelic Renaissance

A Different Kind of Healing Journey

September/October 2018
It’s been nearly 30 years since SSRIs came on the scene, but despite their ubiquity and pairing with a variety of talk- and body-centered treatments, the rates of PTSD, depression, and anxiety are soaring. Could the ineffable insights and experiences of psychedelic drugs revolutionize the practice of psychotherapy?
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!

The Challenge of Psychedelic Therapy

How It Could Change Your Practice

September/October 2018
With his latest book, How to Change Your Mind, noted author Michael Pollan has drawn a comprehensive portrait of the growing psychedelic therapy movement. In this interview, he highlights what has most impressed him about the promise of this new vision for therapy and the challenges it faces in gaining widespread acceptance.

Point of View

Art and Trauma: Accessing Creative Paths to Healing

March/April 2018
A leader in expressive arts therapy explains why it’s increasingly being used to help combat vets find relief from trauma.

Who's Steering the Boat?

Navigating Therapy with Today's Clients

January/February 2018
Today’s clients are shifting out of their customary position of mannerly deference and asserting far more specifically what they want—and don’t want—from therapy. Increasingly, therapists are moving from the role of acknowledged expert in the room to something approaching an informed colleague. For some, it’s a sea change in professional identity, but a growing body of evidence suggests it pays off.

Turns in the Road

Highlights from the Networker Journey

January/February 2017
Out of all the hundreds and hundreds of articles that have appeared in the Networker over the past four decades, we’ve chosen a small sampling that captures the magazine’s most journalistic side, conveying not so much the eternal verities of our profession, but the sense of reading a first draft of the field’s history. Among other things, you’ll find therapeutic methods that, as exciting as they seemed at the moment, didn’t stand the test of time as well as initial forays into discussing complex issues we’re still struggling with today. We’ve also added in a few examples of writing so immediate and compelling that they have an air of timelessness. Prepare yourself for an interesting journey.
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!

Left to Our Own Devices

Sorting Through The Bewildering World Of Therapeutic Apps

November/December 2016
Mobile apps offer tools for everything from depression, social anxiety, and binge eating to phobias, OCD, postpartum problems, and substance abuse recovery. In some cases, they’re even being marketed as actual providers of therapy, or at least therapy-like help. Since solace-by-app is here to stay, what do therapists need to know?
Bonus - Read the entire article FREE!

Is VR a Game Changer?

Virtual Reality in Therapy

November/December 2016
To date, virtual reality’s most visible therapeutic role has been in the treatment of phobias and other conditions where it’s served as an adjunct to imaginary and in-vivo modalities. However, newer applications have started to move beyond the idea of altering our sense of place to emphasize altering our very sense of self. So what will that mean for our field?

The Bonds of War

PTSD Reconsidered

September/October 2016
“In addition to all the destruction and loss of life, war also inspires ancient human virtues of courage, loyalty, and selflessness that can be utterly intoxicating to the people who experience them,” writes war correspondent Sebastian Junger. He believes understanding that experience and the alienation that can accompany a soldier’s return to civilian life is the key to understanding the persistence of PTSD in so many war vets today.
Page 1 of 4 (34 Magazine Articles)