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Helping Children Conquer the OCD "Worry Hill"

A Child-Friendly Approach to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Aureen Pinto Wagner • No Comments

By Aureen Pinto Wagner - While CBT is widely considered the treatment of choice for children with OCD, effectiveness is contingent on overcoming a formidable obstacle: children's reluctance to engage in exposure therapy because they think that facing their fears without performing rituals will be too scary and impossible. Here's a fun yet effective approach that tackles this problem.

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Learning to Manage the OCD Bully

A Story of One Woman’s Journey for Help

Diane Cole • No Comments

By Diane Cole - An OCD sufferer describes the frustrating stops and starts and misdirections of her circuitous search for help in escaping the maze of her family of origin and the deep-seated tropes in her own brain.

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Helping Children Master Anxiety with a Superhero's Gusto

Putting Kids in the Therapeutic Driver's Seat

Lynn Lyons • No Comments

By Lynn Lyons - Why are our children so anxious and getting more so? It seems puzzling. After all, we live in the age of “helicopter parents” and ubiquitous child professionals. But too often in our anxiety to stop the anxiety, we surround the child with an anxiety-reinforcing system fixated on protecting the child from any twinge of the dreaded disease.

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The Healing Power of Uncertainty

Our Traditional Approaches to Anxiety Treatment Aren't Good Enough

Reid Wilson • No Comments

By Reid Wilson - Therapy with anxious clients is most effective when I repeatedly challenge their underlying beliefs about how to handle distress. Anxious clients don't need my cleverness. They need therapeutic principles powerful enough to offset their faulty beliefs. I've learned to help my anxious clients by challenging three of their most basic life stances: their attitudes toward worry, certainty, and comfort.

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My Nightmare Client, My Greatest Gift

Sometimes Our "Worst" Clients Are Our Best Teachers

Martha Straus • No Comments

By Martha Straus - My young client, Brian, can reduce even confident mid-life adults to an infantile puddle, one provocative comment at a time. He's a therapist's nightmare. But he’s also the universe's gift to me. He measures my commitment to the work, to him, to my ideas about therapy, to my best self.

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What Has Psychopharmacology Taught Us?

And the Four Psychological Conditions We Now Know Are Lifelong Disorders

John Preston • No Comments

By John Preston - Ultimately, while psychiatric drugs do save lives, the fact remains that integrative treatment (psychotherapy, lifestyle changes, exercise, and sometimes medications) works best. It behooves us to give our clients the best we have to offer, which involves much more than just offering pills to temporarily relieve symptoms.

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The 6 Most-Read Networker Articles of 2016

A Look Back at This Year's Popular Reads, Chosen by You

Chris Lyford • No Comments

By Chris Lyford - As 2017 approaches, we're taking stock of the past year. Join us in looking back at the most-read online Networker articles of 2016, chosen by you!

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The Essential Component of Treating Children with OCD

A Family Therapy Approach to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Lynn Lyons • No Comments

By Lynn Lyons - OCD, like other anxiety disorders, is like a cult leader, demanding acceptance of a skewed view of reality. It shows up and makes an announcement that’s distressing--the obsessive thought. It then posits a solution to the distress, some action, either internal or external, that offers temporary relief---the compulsion. But by including parents in therapy, it demystifies the disorder and allows them to be part of a family plan to deal with it.

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Treating OCD Without Co-Compulsing

When Traditional Therapy Won't Work

Martin Seif and Sally Winston • No Comments

By Martin Seif and Sally Winston - It’s now clear that much of what therapists do for people suffering from OCD actually worsens the problem. Providing empathic reassurance, rational disputation, and coping skills to manage anxiety only serves to refuel the obsession. So how do you avoid the dead end of co-compulsing with your clients?

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Getting to the Hidden Cause of Anxiety

David Burns on the Origin of His Hidden Emotion Technique

David Burns • No Comments

When I first began my career in CBT, it seemed to work a lot better than medications and talk therapy, and clients liked it. Sometimes, the results were fast and spectacular. But something was missing. It seemed obvious that negative thoughts triggered anxiety, but what caused the negative thoughts? What was it inside a person that made him or her so vulnerable to intense anxiety and insecurity? Then one day, one of my patients got me to thinking about anxiety in an entirely new way.

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