Archives

Sort by:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Revisited

CBT Isn't as Manualized as You Think, Says Judith Beck

Mary Sykes Wylie

By Mary Sykes Wylie - Today, cognitive behavioral therapy is among the most widely practiced and promulgated approach in the world. But for all its mantle of scientific rigor and official approval, many therapists find CBT's "lab therapy" hard to love, if not downright dislikable. In the following interview, renowned CBT clinician Judith Beck explains how the method works, and why it's gotten a bum rap.

Read more...

The Cure Myth

We Need to Start Treating Anxiety and Depression as Chronic Conditions

Margaret Wehrenberg

By Margaret Wehrenberg - I’ve begun to put aside my idealized view that unless people overcome their difficulties once and for all, therapy is somehow a failure. That perspective seems simplistic and disconnected from the realities of what psychotherapy can actually provide. Evidence continues to accumulate that many people who have anxiety and depression suffer bouts of it all their lives, even after a good response to therapy.

Read more...

VIDEO: Continuing to See Kids for Therapy as They Age

...And Why They Need Ongoing Connection Now More Than Ever

Lynn Lyons

When therapists work with anxious kids and their families, they’re often solving immediate problems, not envisioning a clinical relationship that could last for decades. But that’s what happened for brief therapist Lynn Lyons. Here, she talks about the unexpected pleasures of being there for her youngest clients as they grow into teens and young adults.

Read more...

Judith Beck on the CBT Approach to Depression

...And Her Response to Therapists Who Think It's Too Structured and Restrictive

Judith Beck

By Judith Beck - In the following interview with CBT pioneer Judith Beck, she explains the basics of the cognitive therapy approach to depression, including its step-by-step process, why homework is so important, and how good CBT therapists confront the possibility of relapse from the very first session.

Read more...

A Paradigm of Wholeness

Offering Medication as the Primary—And Often Only—Treatment Isn't Working

Henry Emmons

By Henry Emmons - Today, medication management remains the primary role of most psychiatrists. In my view, it’s not working well, either for our patients, or for ourselves. Feeling deeply that something was missing in my own psychiatry practice, I developed a three-stage process for treating depression through more holistic, integrative work.

Read more...

We Need to Talk About Depression Recurrence

Talking About Staying Well After Therapy May Be Lifesaving

Marian Sandmaier

By Marian Sandmaier - Virtually all clinicians make clear to departing clients that they’re welcome to return to therapy at any point. But for clients with recurrent depression, that may not be enough. I propose that before termination, therapists talk with clients candidly about the possibility of another episode of suffering down the line.

Read more...

Five Ways to Maintain Gains in Couples Therapy

...And the First Question You Need to Ask Relapsing Partners

Jon Carlson

By Jon Carlson - Couples therapists need to be aware of the strategies that prevent relapse, so that short-term successes don't become long-term failures, and to address those areas in the initial therapy with the couple. However, if gains are not maintained, here are five areas of treatment you may need to revisit.

Read more...

Effectively Treating Eating Disorders Is a Matter of Life and Death

What Needs to Happen in the First Session

Sandra Wartski

By Sandra Wartski - Any therapist who's worked with eating disorders knows that treatment can be a rocky journey. While it can be unpredictable, scary, and slow, my work with one client helped reinforce my optimism that recovery is possible.

Read more...

The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach to Overcoming Depression

Judith Beck Explains Her Method of Depression Treatment

Judith Beck

The hallmark of cognitive therapy is understanding clients’ reactions—emotional and behavioral—in terms of how they interpret situations. The repeated themes in people’s thinking and behavior finally make sense once we understand the basic way they view themselves, their world, and other people. But cognitive therapy goes beyond helping people understand their thoughts and behaviors in sessions. People actually get better by making small changes in their thinking and behavior every day. As therapy progresses, homework assignments and relapse prevention become essential parts of the approach.

Read more...

Beating Relapse to the Punch

How to Preempt Anxiety Relapse

Rich Simon

Before David Burns wraps up therapy with recovered clients, he makes sure they’re well prepared for relapse. In this brief video clip, he breaks down the components of his Relapse Prevention Training.

Read more...

Page 1 of 2 (11 Blog Posts)